Friday November 10 - Main Stage

Opening Ceremonies 1:00 - 1:30 pm

Prayer By: Chief Glenna Wallace
Color Guard: Quapaw Color Guard

Rights of Nature with Casey Camp: 1:30-2:45 pm
Native Americans operate under the conviction that all objects and elements of the earth—both living and nonliving—have an individual spirit that is part of the greater soul of the universe.

Ventriloquist Buddy Bigmountain & Friends: 3:00 – 4:00 pm
Buddy is a member of the Iroquois Nation and is a registered member of the Mohawk of Kahnawake Tribe of Canada. Buddy is not only a Ventriloquist, but also a Comedian and Master Puppeteer. He was the first Native American ventriloquist and soon became one of Indian Country's most popular comedy entertainers today.

Indigenuity: Learning the lessons of Mother Earth with Dan Wildcat: 4:15 – 5:15 pm
Presenter: Dan Wildcat
Panelist: Thomas McNulty, Summerdawn Klain
Indigenuity is the application of deep-spatial wisdom held by Indigenous Peoples to solve practical problems we face today. Indigenuity is the result of a People’s long intergenerational transmissions of experiential knowledge over millennia resulting from their attentiveness to the inextricable symbiotic nexus of human cultures and the ecosystems/environments that gave tribal Peoples their culture and identity. As such Indigenuity is a co-creation of humans and plants, animals, and other natural features of the world.

Fashion Show by Lea McCormick & Andra Freeman: 5:30 - 6:15 pm
This event will showcase Native American Fashion designers and their upcoming line of clothing and/or accessories. This Fashion show will promote their new fashions.

God is Red with Bobby Bridger: 6:30pm – 8:00 pm
Moderator: Matt Robinson
Panelists: Max Gail, Dan Wildcat, Derek Jennings & Students including Keziah Pinewalker, a student in Indigenous and American Indian Studies Program at Haskell Indian Nations University. She is a member of the Navajo Nation.

We are honoring Vine Deloria Jr.’s 50 anniversary of the publication of God Is Red. He was a prominent Native American educator, lawyer, and philosopher, with classic work on native religion. In God is Red, Deloria argues convincingly that Christianity has failed today's society, and describes basic tenets that underlie Native religions.

Saturday November 11th - Main Stage

Opening prayer and welcome: 11:00 am - 11:15 am

Black Elks Prayer: Bobby Bridger
Welcome by: Charlotte Buchanan-Yale

Transforming the Charitable Food Experience by Partnering with Native and Tribal Communities 11:20 - 12:15 pm
Presenter: Mark Ford - Feeding America

Mark is the Director of Native/Tribal Partnerships at Feeding America officed within the Communications and Community Engagement Department, where he assists Feeding America’s network members to develop or enhance relationships with Native and tribal communities, champion initiatives that address hunger and food insecurity, promote Native American Food Sovereignty and support local leaders to advocate on behalf of their communities.
The Regional Food Bank has led the fight against hunger in central and western Oklahoma. The Regional Food Bank is the state's largest domestic nonprofit that distributes food through a network of community-based partners and schools.

Simon Washee Dance Troupe: 12:20 - 1:00 pm

Simon is a world renown champion fancy dancer and leads his dance troupe in an exciting hour of exhibition dancing. He starred in “Fancy Dancer” a short film that was shot in and around the Miami area.

Rising Voices/ Changing Coasts - Environmental Justice with Dan Wildcat: 1:10 – 2:00 pm
Presenter: Dan Wildcat
Panelist: Ryan Kingfisher, Marquel Holiday, Alicia Warrington & Cheyene Yargee

The Rising Voices, Changing Coasts is a coastal research project that brings together university-trained scientists and Indigenous knowledge-holders to study the interactions between natural, human-built, and social systems in coastal populated environments.

Tribal Food Sovereignty with Mark Ford: 2:10 – 4:15 pm
Panelists: May Hey, Nico Albert, Angela Ferguson, Casey Camp, and Wendy Thomas

Food sovereignty as the right and ability of tribal nations and peoples to freely develop and implement self-determined definitions of food sovereignty; cultivate, access, and secure nutritious, culturally essential food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods.

Heal in the Wisom "songs" with Bobby Bridger: 4:30 – 5:45 pm
Bobby is a singer/songwriter/poet/actor/playwright/author and painter who for five decades has traveled the globe performing a trilogy of one man shows for audiences in America, Canada, Europe, Australia, and Russia. He has recorded numerous albums for labels including Monument Records, RCA, and Golden Egg Records. He will be singing a collection of his songs and is the composer of "Heal in The Wisdom", the official anthem of the Kerrville Folk Festival for over 40 years.

Revisionism & Representation of Native Americans in film with Mark Abbott: 6:00 – 7:30 pm
Panelists: Delanna Studi, Tricia Wood, Harrison Lowe, Max Gail, Casey Camp Horinek

We will examine the historical roles of Native Americans in the Hollywood film industry and how the representations of their cultures were portrayed in the media.

American Indians have regained control of their images by becoming the producers, directors, and writers of their own stories, and now are able to combat stereotypes, and the exclusion of Native Americans in the creative process. Positive social change for minority populations can be optimized when they are in control of their own images in film and media.

Presentation of Awards - Closing Remarks: Charlotte Buchanan-Yale

“A Love Song” starring: Wes Studi & Dale Dickey: 7:45 pm
Faye is a lone traveler who bides her time fishing, birding, and stargazing at a rural Colorado campground as she awaits the arrival of Lito, a figure from her past who's navigating his own tentative and nomadic journey across the rugged West.

Food Trucks and Vendors will be available Friday and Saturday to the Public. A Silent Auction will also take place Friday and Saturday

FRIDAY NOV 10
COLEMAN ANNEX - UPSTAIRS - PANEL ROOMS

Upstairs Foyer
Native films Friday 1:00 - 5:30 pm
Los Americanos
Saynday
The little Truck
The Grandfather
Running on Indian Time
Fancy Dancer
Imaging the Indian


Annex Exhibit Hall Upstairs
Vendors 11:00 am - 5:00pm


PANEL ROOM 1

Shawl Making Class 10:00 - 1:00 pm
Presenter:
Carolyn Nott
(Limited to 20 participants with a payment of $30 for materials.)
This class will be limited to individuals that want to learn shawl making. Participants will be provided material and fringe with the opportunity to display the shawl that they have made, in the fashion show the same night.

The Shawl is an integral piece of regalia for all female dancers. Women’s Traditional is the oldest style of women’s dance. When a dancer is in full regalia and you have a shawl, it is draped over the arm, with the fringe swaying gracefully. The shawl is like the wings of a bird, with the decorative fringe, its feathers. When not in full regalia, it is proper to wear a shawl while dancing. Most arena directors will require this.


Traditional Foods - Meet the Chefs & Food Sampling 1:30 - 3:00 pm
Demonstrators:
May Hey, Nico Albert, Angela Ferguson, Wendy Thomas
Our Chef’s mission is the revitalization of the Indigenous food to nourish the mind, soul, and body. It is intrinsic and transformational Indigenous food sovereignty that will allow Native people the opportunity to look at cultural practices that have long been lost. They will address issues that will help you to restore your health through Indigenous food recipes and how you can help the local economies and preserve the sovereignty of Native foods.


Native Book Writing & How to publish your own stories 3:15 - 4:30 pm
“I Wrote the Next Best Thing...Now What Do I Do?”
Presenter:
Martha Jordan

With the last stroke of the keyboard, budding authors around the globe often find themselves sitting at their computers, staring at their monitors. They have just completed what they feel is their best manuscript. The next best thing. Unfortunately, they have no clue where to go from there. How do I get my work published? Martha will help answer those questions. Attendees of this panel are highly encouraged to bring samples of their work, and if they are serious about embarking on the journey, they are instructed to leave their egos at home.

Native Flute making panel 4:45 - 5:45
Presenter:
Nelson Scotty Harjo


PANEL ROOM 2

Tribal Healthcare IHS 1:30 - 2:30
Moderator:
George Valliere


Native Storytelling 2:45 - 4:45
Storytellers:
Gayle Ross, Scottie Harjo, Will Hill

Indigenous peoples have strong storytelling traditions. Histories, stories, and religious rites were/are passed from the memories of one generation to the next through the spoken word. The worldview of Native people is intricately woven into the fabric of language and ways of speaking. The oral tradition connects past, present, and future and tightens tribal and familial bonds. These oral traditions can provide moral lessons for children on how to behave; they can communicate creation stories, cultural beliefs, and personal, family, or tribal history and experiences. Creation stories are often sacred and only told through the oral tradition.


Tribal Housing Issues 5:00 - 6:00 pm
Presenter:
Mariah Tyner

Housing Improvement Program (HIP), also known as Housing Program (HP), seeks to enhance the quality of life of qualified individuals by addressing sub-standard housing and homelessness for members of federally recognized Tribes. The program provides grant funding for housing repairs and renovations of existing homes, construction of modest replacement homes, housing down payments to use in conjunction with other Federal and State programs, or construction of modest homes for families who do not own a home but have ownership or lease of sufficient land suitable for housing.

SATURDAY NOV 11

Upstairs Foyer
Native films Friday 1:00 - 5:30 pm
Los Americanos
Saynday
The little Truck
The Grandfather
Running on Indian Time
Fancy Dancer
Imaging the Indian


Annex Exhibit Hall Upstairs
Vendors 11:00 am - 5:00pm


PANEL ROOM 1

Moccasin Making Workshop 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Presenter:
Awk-A-Noxie Hamilton

Heal in the Wisdom “songs” 1:15 - 2:15 pm
Singer:
Bobby Bridger

Bobby is a singer/songwriter/poet/actor/playwright/author and painter who for five decades has traveled the globe performing a trilogy of one man shows for audiences in America, Canada, Europe, Australia, and Russia. He has recorded numerous albums for labels including Monument Records, RCA, and Golden Egg Records. He will be singing a collection of his songs and is the composer of "Heal in The Wisdom", the official anthem of the Kerrville Folk Festival for over 40 years.


Native Pottery History to now 2:30 - 3:30
Presenter:
Betty Gaedtke

The Native American art of pottery making is a medium that combines the elements of the earth in both creation and design. Pottery served the people of Native American tribes as much more than a tool. The clay was a canvas for the Native Americans to express themselves through symbols and designs or signify belonging to a specific tribe or family. The pots ranged from use in everyday life, to sacred spiritual ceremonies.


Traditional Native Games 3:45 - 5:30 pm
Presenter:
Joey Giveswater

Game playing is a pastime enjoyed by most people. Native Americans are no exception. The origins of many games were for ceremony. Because of this, games were played to bring rain, ensure good harvests, cure illness, expel evil spirits, or give pleasure to the gods by demonstrating physical fitness. Though games are usually played for fun and pleasure, Native American games also played a role in the education of children by helping them develop skills necessary to be successful adults. Today they are defined in the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act: Class I gaming is defined as (1) traditional Indian gaming, which may be part of tribal ceremonies and celebrations, and (2) social gaming for minimal prizes. Regulatory authority over class I gaming is vested exclusively in tribal governments and is not subject to IGRA's requirements.



PANEL ROOM 2

Native Storytelling 10:45 am - 12:45pm
Storytellers:
Gayle Ross, Scottie Harjo, Will Hill

Indigenous peoples have strong storytelling traditions. Histories, stories, and religious rites were/are passed from the memories of one generation to the next through the spoken word. The worldview of Native people is intricately woven into the fabric of language and ways of speaking. The oral tradition connects past, present, and future and tightens tribal and familial bonds. These oral traditions can provide moral lessons for children on how to behave; they can communicate creation stories, cultural beliefs, and personal, family, or tribal history and experiences. Creation stories are often sacred and only told through the oral tradition.


Live Theatre & Stage Images of Indians 1:00 - 2:30 pm
Moderator:
Delanna Studi
Panelist: Casey Camp, Harrison Lowe, Mary Sue Price

Early Native American culture was rich with ceremonies, rituals, and storytelling. The stories that inspire Native American theatre have been around for hundreds of years. Yet they did not employ Native people but had “white Indians”, because they “laid claim, not to real Indian practices, of course, but to the idea of native custom”. They reinforced stereotypical views of Native Americans, which were merely fictional creations of the American writers. These early plays stand at the beginning of a long, culturally productive process involving various representations of Native Americans in the performing arts. All of that began to change with the birth of Native Theatre companies such as The American Indian Theatre Co., The American Indian Theatre Ensemble, Thunderbird Theater, Spiderwoman Theater and now Native Voices at the Autry to just name a few of the newest companies.


Sustainability of Hemp 2:45 - 3:45 pm
Moderator:
Matt Robinson
Panelist: Jason Giles, J R Mathews

Hemp is a sustainable plant requiring less water or pesticides in cultivation compared to cotton. It has a short growth period and almost its whole plant body has versatile utility value. Hemp seeds are high-protein, low-carbohydrate, and rich in dietary fiber and unsaturated fatty acids.


Ledger Art and the Quandary of Intellectual Property & Cultural Appropriation 4:00 - 5:00 pm
Presenter:
DG Smalling

At its heart it is the notion that if we (Indian Country) do not want Cultural Appropriation, then we must not appropriate from others. No laws nor cultural norms will be encroached nor broken, and this process is as much the exhibition focus. As I have been part of the Land Ownership and British Government Treaties Project from its inception, also that my artwork is under Delaware Nation of Oklahoma to create on their behalf as mandate, whilst being a Master Artist of the Choctaw Nation—I have had to create a strategy of ‘Cultural Collaboration’ to guide my various efforts & ventures.

UPCOMING EVENT!

Coming to the HISTORIC COLEMAN THEATRE  in downtown Miami, Oklahoma. Check out the events page for more information.
NOVEMBER 10-11

FREE ADMISSION!

Native American Cultural Celebration
Renewing and Empowering
Indigenous Narratives.
Meet our Sponsors
© 2023 REIGN. All rights reserved.